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Archived & Upcoming Images of the Day

31 Jul 2019

A chance to compare Little Owl and Tawny Owl in similar positions.


Ref: D01_20190614_2125_133+20190615_0230_141_FB6 Little Owl & Tawny Owl at identical scales (montage).jpg

Little Owls always seem to look disagreeable.
But it a more a human perception than an actual display of mental state.


Ref: D01_20190615_1328_168+1329_170_FB6 Little Owl short daytime visit to Meadow Post 1+2 of 2 (montage).jpg

30 Jul 2019

The morning of last day of continuous rain sees this uncomfortable looking Jackdaw waiting on the bare tree-stump.


Ref: D36_20190614_0619_032_FB4 Jackdaw juvenile in rain.jpg

A juvenile Magpie, with no sight of an adult, takes their portrait.


Ref: E63_20190618_1751_225_FB1 Magpie juvenile.jpg

We have lost count of the Great Spotted Woodpecker juveniles, now with the full spread from 'Feed Me' to 'I'll Feed Myself' including the 'I'll accept what's offered but find my own as well'.


Ref: E60_20190619_1432_107_FB3 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile landing.jpg

29 Jul 2019

A female Chaffinch flying in to a feeding site determined to see off another already feeding.


Ref: E64_20190613_1630_077_FB2 Chaffinch female attacking another (out of crop) (crop).jpg

A male Chaffinch about to make a slight mistimed landing on the edge of the Tree-stump.


Ref: D36_20190617_1555_012_FB4 Chaffinch male landing on edge of tree-stump.jpg

A female Chaffinch flies away from the kitchen window bird table with a seed in her beak.


Ref: E60_20190617_1604_029_FB3 Chaffinch female in flight with seed in beak.jpg

28 Jul 2019

A Red-legged Partridge takes a nice photo of themself.


Ref: E62_20190608_1330_163_FB5 Red-legged Partridge.jpg

A male Yellow hammer stops by for an early delivery of corn and seeds. The beak is powerful with an interesting curve shape.


Ref: E63_20190611_1444_179_FB1 Yellowhammer male.jpg

27 Jul 2019

The Tree Sparrows have produced their first round of youngsters, and are getting down to the business of making the next batch.
The juvenile Great Spotted Woodpecker stayed throughout, more interested in looking for the next feed.


Ref: D5C_20190613_1113_003-011 Tree Sparrows mating in rain twice & Great Spotted Woodpecker juv 02+05-07+10 of 10 (montage).jpg

Its cold and wet - a good time to huddle up with your sibling.


Ref: E60_20190612_1621_136_FB3 2 Tree Sparrow Juveniles huddled together on perch (crop).jpg

A Tree Sparrow family clustered in the drizzle.


Ref: E60_20190613_0735_005_FB3 Tree Sparrow adult with 3 juveniles in drizzle.jpg

26 Jul 2019

As darkness descends the Little Owl makes a visit.


Ref: D01_20190610_2107_159+2055_155+2102_157_FB6 Little Owl visit(s) to meadow post 3+1+2 of 3 (montage).jpg

"I may be little, but I can be fierce!"


Ref: D01_20190610_0436_081_FB6 Little Owl makes 3 visits to Meadow Post over 8 hours 10 of 19 (crop).jpg

A Little Owl stops on the post for a few minutes in the middle of the afternoon.
These birds can be seen day and night - so when do they sleep?
It seems that they are only partially diurnal and sleep for some of the day. If you find one sleeping in the day you may get a really close look at the bird.


Ref: D01_20190611_1546_355+1547_357+1550_365_FB6 Little Owl 5 minute daytime visit to Meadow post 1+2+6 of 6 (montage).jpg

It's easy to forget that Little Owls are about both day and night. Here unusually caught in flight - the fully stretched out wings appear longer than we expected.


Ref: E60_20190613_1713_023_FB3 Little Owl flying towards camera.jpg

25 Jul 2019

On a single night and morning we had quite a procession of visitations.
Left to right, top then bottom:-
1 The Little Owl made a short visit showing the illusory back of the head
         that still looks like a hawk to us even though we know that it isn't.
1-2 Between these frames a Bat flew by - see later.
2,3,4,5 A longer visit by the Little Owl
6 A Wood Pigeon made a brief stop at first light (slightly Grey background)
7, 8 The Little Owl makes another visit as the day lightens.


Ref: D01_20190609_2117_063-21090610_0552_113_FB6 Little Owl 3 visits to Meadow Post in 8hrs 2-4+7+11+12+15+18 of 19 (montage 2).jpg

Between the first and second little Owl pics we had a frame exposed for no obvious reason. 'Winding up the brightness' found this bat flying at about 3m high behind the post. The extreme lightening avoids the post, which would otherwise appear almost white.


Ref: D01_20190610_0038_065_FB6 Bat flying past meadow post (heavily processed crop).jpg

24 Jul 2019

A few female Beautiful Demoiselle Damselflies appeared over the 'Duck-shaped' pond, perching on the Hop-sedge and then dashing off after prey (too small for us to see). This female flew into the frame from the right, looped around and landed into the breeze at a crease in the leaf which she had left a second or two before. All this in about 2/3 of a second.
The sequence is middle right, left along the top, middle left, bottom on leaf. The Montage is fairly accurate but slightly adjusted to avoid overlaps.
We can supply the camera originals if you should want them. Both of our 'favourite pic of the week'.


Ref: DF5_20190609_1745_031-035 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly female in flight lands on Hop Sedge 1-5 of 9 (adj montage @7fps).jpg

On the last sunny day before the rains the Beautiful Demoiselle Damselflies still flutter around us along the sunny walks. This is a male.


Ref: DF5_20190609_1532_122 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly male.jpg

On the last sunny day before the rains the Beautiful Demoiselle Damselflies still flutter around us along the sunny walks. This is the female.


Ref: DF5_20190609_1532_123 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly female.jpg

23 Jul 2019

This is the first sighting here for 8 years (last time in May 2011) of one of these Thick-legged Flower Beetles. Several seen since this sighting.


Ref: DF5_20190609_1527_102 Thick-legged Flower Beetle (Oedemera nobilis) on Hogweed (crop).jpg

What is called a Mint Beetle, living up to it's name, on a Mint leaf.


Ref: DF5_20190607_0527_030 Mint Beetle on Mint leaf.jpg

22 Jul 2019

From the outside of our patch we spotted this pristine juvenile Blue Tit, who offered us forward and profile views.


Ref: DF5_20190609_0846_004+006 Blue Tit juvenile inn hedge bush (montage).jpg

A juvenile Great Tit.
The sharp edge of the head's Black-Yellow boundary always exactly aligns with the bottom of the eye.


Ref: E60_20190607_1124_033_FB3 Great Tit juvenile.jpg

House Sparrows are becoming a more regular sight here. Not as agile as the Tits, they manage the Peanut feeders by perching on the anti-squirrel 'cage' to reach the nuts. Here is one stopping off on the Meadow Post, beak full of feather(s) that must be for a nest somewhere.


Ref: D01_20190607_0730_168_FB6 House Sparrow with feather in beak.jpg

21 Jul 2019

Mother Great Spotted Woodpecker seems to be offering to feed the inverted youngster, but the youngster 'lets go' and within 15cm of so of the fall is already mostly turned over for normal flight. Such agility.


Ref: DF5_20190608_1221_029+031 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile under perch drops away 1+3 of 3 (accurate montage).jpg

In this pair of images about half a second apart you can see the fragment of peanut in the adults beak (right) appear in the juveniles beak.


Ref: DF5_20190609_1007_015+018 Great Spotted Woodpecker adult feeding juvenile 1+3 of 3 (montage).jpg

This juvenile Great Spotted Woodpecker sits in the rain awaiting the next beakful of 'squishy things', or maybe even more peanuts.


Ref: E60_20190613_1011_010_FB3 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile waiting in rain.jpg

20 Jul 2019

A Green Woodpecker female is looking in need of a Preen.
These birds mostly hunt in the ground and in Ant's nests as you can see from the state of her beak.


Ref: D01_20190608_0712_281_FB6 Green Woodpecker female with muddy beak in rain.jpg

A really soggy adult Green Woodpecker starts a rainy day.
Here begins 4 days of almost continuous rain and drizzle, during which over 90mm of rain (3.5 inches) was accompanied by endless overcast skies.


Ref: D01_20190611_0649_165_FB6 Green Woodpecker landing rain soaked on meadow post 1 of 2 (crop).jpg

19 Jul 2019

A male Great Spotted Woodpecker has a rest on the Meadow post before resuming his 'feed the chicks' duties.


Ref: D01_20190606_1702_082+1709_083_FB6 Great Spotted Woodpecker male takes off from Meadow post 1+2 of 2 (accurate montage).jpg

A juvenile Great Spotted Woodpecker waits hopefully for a feed.


Ref: DF5_20190607_0515_025 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile perched on top of gate post.jpg

All within the same minute, this male Great Spotted Woodpecker managed to take 3 different nicely separated portraits of himself!


Ref: D01_20190607_1254_178+177+182_FB6 Great Spotted Woodpecker male on Meadow Post 2+1+3(mirrored) of 3 (montage).jpg

18 Jul 2019

There are at least 3 juvenile Great Spotted Woodpeckers (with red over the top of the head) being fed by the adults at our peanut feeding stations.
As we watched this encounter seemed almost unreal - the juvenile spent several seconds slowly revolving around the perch to the underside. Dad (red nape) then gave it a feed.


Ref: DF3_20190605_0611_050+065+066+069 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile swings under perch as male attempts to feed it 03+06+07+10 of 13 (montage).jpg

Once there Dad gave him the food, and the juvenile just let go and dropped down to grab the wooden post below the camera frame.


Ref: DF3_20190605_0611_070-072 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile under perch drops down after male feeds it 11-13 of 13 (montage).jpg

There were 3 juvenile Great Spotted Woodpeckers in this tree at once, but true to form one of them flies off before the camera moves to photograph it. The bird on the right was having a bit of a peck at the Blue Tit nestbox but it is made of woodcrete so did no harm.
After a few years most wooden nest boxes get rendered unusable by Woodpecker damage.


Ref: DF5_20190605_1040_089+1039_081 Great Spotted Woodpecker juvenile on Ash tree (1+2 of 3 seen montage).jpg

17 Jul 2019

This large and heavy insect is a Cockchafer Beetle, also widely known as a May Bug. We often find a few in the Moth trap in the morning.
The white flecked wing cases indicate this is a recent emergence.
In common with many Moths and Beetles the males have feathered antennae to detect the chemical signature of females. So this one is a female.


Ref: P10_20190602_1141_349 Cockchafer female (Melolontha melolontha) recently emerged - white flecked wing cases.jpg

This large and heavy insect is a Cockchafer Beetle, also widely known as a May Bug. This one is a male (feathered antennae at the top) lifting the wing cases prior to taking off.


Ref: P10_20190602_1142_355 Cockchafer male (Melolontha melolontha) opening wing cases to fly away (crop).jpg

16 Jul 2019

An early morning walk found this solitary Poppy in the crop margin, along with an attendant Hover-fly. 2 days later it was gone in one of the regular mowing of the field margin and Bridleways. 4 days later the remains of the plant was already working on another flower!


Ref: DF5_20190602_0720_049 Poppy in field grass edge with Hoverfly.jpg

We love the flowers of Irises, their slightly untidy interpretation of 3-fold symmetry is delightful


Ref: D72_20190602_1025_007 White Iris near garage.jpg

15 Jul 2019

This startling moth is called the Burnished Brass. The vivid gold wing patches are created by iridescence, and only show when the lighting and angles are appropriate - it is a rather drab little creature otherwise.
So we got lucky with this one!


Ref: DA1_20190602_1111_124+1158_227_FT1 Burnished Brass moth in flight + foliage (montage).jpg

Here is the Lempkes Gold Spot Moth, in the same family as the Burnished Brass.
After a few minutes of trying unsuccessfully to get an image in flight, we put her on a bit of white card for this photo. This moth gold spots are iridescent like the Burnished Brass, but the white spots are not lighting dependent and must be some sort of reflective white pigmented scales which really outshine the white card at all angles.
As usual, the moment you release them outdoors they fly blithely away.


Ref: P10_20190602_1136_345 Lempkes Gold Spot Moth (Plusia putnami) (1st sighting here) (orig).jpg

14 Jul 2019

This Moth was a delightful 'first' for us - a Green Silver-lines Moth, here in his box warming up for his turn in the spotlight.


Ref: DA1_20190602_1119_142_FT1 Green Silver-lines Moth in Box (1st record here).jpg

The Green Silver-lines Moth performed nicely in flight - this is two of the flights.


Ref: DA1_20190602_1120_146+150+1159_237_FT1 Green Silver-lines Moth in flight (1st record here) + Blackberry stem (montage).jpg

This Small Magpie Moth fly by and landed in a hedge plant.
It turned out not to be a 'vanilla' Magpie Moth, but a different species the Small Magpie Moth.
A search of our archives finds that some of our 'Magpie Moth' ID's should be 'Small Magpie Moth', not yet corrected


Ref: DF5_20190604_0842_028 Small Magpie moth (inverted under twig).jpg

13 Jul 2019

This Cinnabar Moth kept flying by us, and we couldn't resist catching it for a few photos. You don't usually see the bright red whole wing on the resting insect.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1421_001+1450_042_FT1 Cinnabar Moth in flight + foliage (montage).jpg

The moth trap from the previous night caught this elegant Light Emerald Moth that flew for the camera a few times before release.


Ref: DA1_20190602_1043_028+1044_035+1157_220_FT1 Light Emerald Moth male in 2 flights + Red Campion flowers (montage).jpg

The Blood-vein Moth (no actual blood - just a striking red line across the wings) is also an 'old friend'. Here are 3 flights that show you both sides of the wings.


Ref: DA1_20190602_1126_162+1225_159+1124_156_FT1 Blood-vein Moth in 3 flights (montage).jpg

12 Jul 2019

An early arrival for this female Banded Demoiselle Damselfly. The females don't have the characteristic dark band on the wing that you see on the males. This insect is slightly smaller than the Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly and has lighter and green tinted wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1129_089_FT1 Banded Demoiselle Damselfly female in flight (crop).jpg

An early arrival for this female Banded Demoiselle Damselfly. The females don't have the characteristic dark band on the wing that you see on the males. This insect is slightly smaller than the Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly and has lighter and green tinted wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1138_144_FT1 Banded Demoiselle Damselfly female in flight (crop).jpg

11 Jul 2019

A female Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly has a wonderful green and gold iridescent body. Note the complicated tail tip of the female as opposed to the male.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1147_158_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly female in flight (crop).jpg

A female Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly has a wonderful green and gold iridescent body. Note the complicated tail tip of the female as opposed to the male.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1149_170_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly female in flight (crop).jpg

A female Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly has a wonderful green and gold iridescent body here shown as the detail of the head.


Ref: DF5_20190601_1156_034 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly female (detail crop).jpg

10 Jul 2019

A male Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly with his blue iridescent body and dark wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1112_036_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly male in flight (crop).jpg

A male Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly with his blue iridescent body and dark wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1114_042_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly male in flight (crop).jpg

A male Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly with his blue iridescent body and dark wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1336_228_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly male in flight (crop).jpg

A male Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly with his blue iridescent body and dark wings. The Grey wings are accentuated here as he shows overlaps of 2 and 3 wings.


Ref: DA1_20190601_1354_251_FT1 Beautiful Demoiselle Damselfly male in flight (crop).jpg

09 Jul 2019

An identical scale montage of a Great Spotted Woodpecker female and a Green Woodpecker male. The sexes of each species are of similar size.
So Green Woodpeckers are substantially bigger the GSWs.
Our venerable reference book says 12" and 9" respectively, giving likely weight difference of more than twice (the cube of the linear size).


Ref: D01_20190530_1703_043+044+20190531_0750_132+0751_133_FB6 Great Spotted Woodpecker female & Green Woodpecker male (montage).jpg

08 Jul 2019

Here we see the male Blackbird on 23rd May at 07:52, 26th at 05:00 and 27 at 04:31.
"The children wake up screaming for food earlier each morning".


Ref: E63_20190523_0752_004+20190527_0431_334+20190526_0500_239_FB1 Blackbird male collecting food on 3 increasingly early mornings 1+3+2 of 3 (montage).jpg

5 days later the female Blackbird also made several visits over a couple of days. In the leftmost image (taken last) she has some tiny morsel in the tip of her beak.


Ref: E63_20190528_0613_101+20190527_1911_082+1933_084_FB1 Blackbird female visits (montage).jpg

Both male and female Blackbirds are appearing regularly at this site. We have picked one of each for a little comparative montage.


Ref: E63_20190605_0915_194+20190603_0842_018_FB1 Male and female Blackbirds (montage).jpg

07 Jul 2019

A pair of Yellowhammers breakfasting at 5.30 a.m. (about half an hour after sunrise).


Ref: E63_20190529_0536_204_FB1 Yellowhammer pair.jpg

Probably the same male Yellowhammer visiting the stone over 2 days.


Ref: E63_20190528_0501_097+20190527_1022_025+1557_046_FB1 Yellowhammer male visits (montage).jpg

06 Jul 2019

A Red Kite glides speedily overhead so we get an opportunity for some accurately spaced montages.


Ref: DF5_20190528_1049_018-020 Red Kite in flight 1-3 of 3 (accurate montage @7fps).jpg

A minute later the Red Kite was circling a little further away.
This is about 2 seconds of flight.


Ref: DF5_20190528_1050_042-055 Red Kite in flight 01-14 of 14 (accurate montage @7fps).jpg

05 Jul 2019

A genuine moment from 3 Mallard Ducks in flight. The female (left) and two males flew past, perhaps 100m away.


Ref: DF5_20190527_1732_049 3 Mallard ducks (female + 2 males) in flight 2 of 3 (crop in tight formation).jpg

A few seconds later, this time against some blue sky, the female has moved to the front.


Ref: DF5_20190527_1732_066 3 Mallard ducks (female + 2 males) in flight 3 of 3 (crop).jpg

04 Jul 2019

Still the only species of small Damselfly we are seeing, here a male Azure Damselfly waited long enough to get this portrait. Unusually sharp image along the whole length.


Ref: DF5_20190527_1231_036 Azure Damselfly male on hedge top.jpg

03 Jul 2019

Wild Roses in the hedge give it some sparkle and wonderful fragrance.


Ref: DF5_20190526_0959_033 Wild Rose clump outside east hedge (orig & final).jpg

Here is one of the flowers that has dropped all it's petals (NO we didn't pull them off!) highlighting the stamens.


Ref: DF5_20190526_0752_007 Wild Rose with all petals fallen.jpg

These Rose flowers are a rich source of Pollen. Watching this Honey Bee doing her stuff we noticed that she regularly moved a couple of centimetres from the anthers in order to pack her Pollen Baskets with her most recent collection before returning for more.


Ref: DF5_20190526_1002_044+045 Honey Bee hovering inside wild rose to pollen into Basket 1+2 of 2 (montage).jpg

02 Jul 2019

A very attractive Bee on a cultivated Lavender flower in a large pot. Not seen here before, and since seen on other flowers


Ref: DF5_20190524_1117_149+148 Bee Melecta albinfrons in Lavender flower (montage 2).jpg

If you look up Harlequin Ladybirds you will see a huge variety of appearances, not apparently related to their sex. But they know one another all-right!


Ref: DF5_20190524_1229_193 Harlequin Ladybirds mating with Aphids on leaves.jpg

01 Jul 2019

Swallows have started perching on our electrical power lines. Here one of two perched on a wire took off and made this approach to the other. To us it looked like an attempt to mate with a so-far uncooperative female.


Ref: DF5_20190524_1113_133-137 Swallow in flight approaches & departs another perched on power cable @7fps 1-5 of 5 (montage).jpg

A Swallow perched on a power cable provides a chance at a decent portrait.


Ref: DF5_20190524_1114_141 Swallow perched on mains cable.jpg

 


 

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