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Moths Page 3

Image Taken on 08 Sep 2009 at 20:25    Image of day on 21 Oct 2009

And here actually feeding with the proboscis in a floret. This moth has previously been photographed after being caught in the moth trap - see the image for 12 July 2009.


Ref: 20091021_d01_20090908_2025_055 burnished brass moth feeding on yellow buddleia at night (orig)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 07 Jun 2015 at 13:47    Image of day on 06 Aug 2015

A very common moth here is the 'Burnished Brass'.
Of the several caught in the moth trap this one would fly for us, but the shiny brass effect doesn't show well in flight. Here are 3 images from 3 flights montaged for effect. The top left image was at the top of the camera frame.


Ref: 20150806_da1_20150607_1347_190+1348_193+1349+199_ft1 burnished brass moth in flight (3 separate flights) (montage)(r+mb id@1024).jpg


Image Taken on 02 Jun 2019 at 11:11    Image of day on 15 Jul 2019

This startling moth is called the Burnished Brass. The vivid gold wing patches are created by iridescence, and only show when the lighting and angles are appropriate - it is a rather drab little creature otherwise.
So we got lucky with this one!


Ref: 20190715_da1_20190602_1111_124+1158_227_ft1 burnished brass moth in flight + foliage (montage)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 22 Jun 2014 at 13:54    Image of day on 28 Aug 2014

A regular in the Moth trap - the Burnished Brass moth.
The polished metal look only works with lighting and angles right. and rarely appears in photographs in flight. This was the only frame of the session to show some of the wing as 'burnished'.
The insect is flying upwards showing us the top of the wing.


Ref: 20140828_da1_20140622_1354_188+1334_133_ft1 burnished brass moth in flight with privet leaves (montage)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 14 Jun 2009 at 13:48    Image of day on 12 Jul 2009

Burnished Brass moths are quite small but really beautiful when the light catches the 'burnished' areas properly.


Ref: 20090712_da1_20090614_1348_394 ft1 burnished brass moth on hawthorn twig (web crop)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 08 Sep 2009 at 20:18    Image of day on 21 Oct 2009

We have lived here for 19 years, and enjoyed our yellow buddleia and its visitors by day. Out on a fruitless bat foray on a very mild evening we discovered that it also has a 'night shift'. This is a couple of images of the burnished Brass moth. The first is in flight and shows a partially coiled proboscis


Ref: 20091021_d01_20090908_2018_035 burnished brass moth with proboscis half curled flying to yellow buddleia (web crop)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 28 Aug 2017 at 11:18    Image of day on 13 Oct 2017

The overnight moth trap caught several of these Thorn Moths - we think the Canary-shouldered variety. Here is an interpretation of a series of separate flights.


Ref: 20171013_da1_20170828_1118_010-1127_032_ft1 canary-shouldered (q) thorn moth 4 flights & on box (impression montage)(r+mb id@1024).jpg


Image Taken on 11 Aug 2013 at 11:02    Image of day on 02 Oct 2013

This vivid Canary-shouldered Thorn moth is - well - just beautiful.
Not a single flight but an impression


Ref: 20131002_da1_20130811_1102_110+1058_086_ft1 canary-shouldered thorn moth on hawthorn and in flight (montage)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 01 May 2011 at 15:25    Image of day on 30 May 2011

This Chocolate-tip moth is a new sighting for us, but was a reluctant flier.


Ref: 20110530_da1_20110501_1525_189_ft1 chocolate-tip moth (clostera curtula) in flight (rotated crop)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 01 May 2011 at 16:03    Image of day on 30 May 2011

So here he is so he looks like the photo in the ID book!


Ref: 20110530_da1_20110501_1603_303_ft1 chocolate-tip moth (clostera curtula) on hawthorn twig (crop)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 26 Jun 2018 at 15:13    Image of day on 12 Aug 2018

A Cinnabar Moth showing us the gloriously coloured top of the rear wings that make the insect so striking when it is in flight.


Ref: 20180812_df3_20180626_1513_022 cinnabar moth(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 27 May 2017 at 11:47    Image of day on 20 Jul 2017

The striking Cinnabar Moth makes a great splash of colour.
The only other UK insect we know of with these colours (but different pattern) are the Burnet Moth family.


Ref: 20170720_da1_20170527_1147_191+1323_194_ft1 cinnabar moth + hawthorn twig (montage)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 17 Jul 2020 at 12:40    Image of day on 22 Aug 2020

Here are a couple of views of the Cinnabar Moth which, with a bit of luck, the caterpillars will become.


Ref: 20200822_df3_20200717_1240_177+1244_226 cinnabar moth 1+3 of 3 (montage)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 01 Jun 2021 at 13:01    Image of day on 30 Jun 2021

Another two moments from Cinnabar Moth flights.


Ref: 20210630_da1_20210601_1301_109+1303_123 cinnabar moth 2 flight (montage)_ft1(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 09 Jun 2020 at 13:07    Image of day on 12 Jul 2020

A Cinnabar Moth with a contrasting Buttercup which helps to set the scale.


Ref: 20200712_df3_20200609_1307_081 cinnabar moth and buttercup(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 12 Jul 2020 at 10:51    Image of day on 22 Aug 2020

While lots of insects use Ragwort nectar as fuel, the Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar normally specialises in eating the poisonous Ragwort leaves that other insects can't eat. Apparently they store the poisons in their bodies to protect both the Caterpillar and the adult moth from predators. So not a Moth - YET.


Ref: 20200822_d73_20200712_1051_028 cinnabar moth caterpillar on ragwort(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 05 Aug 2013 at 15:48    Image of day on 25 Sep 2013

An unusual excess of Ragwort in our meadow brought with it an unprecedented number of Cinnabar caterpillars. Ragwort is poisonous to some mammals, but it is the only food plant of these caterpillars.


Ref: 20130925_p10_20130805_1548_889 cinnabar moth caterpillar on ragwort (crop)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 05 Aug 2013 at 15:49    Image of day on 25 Sep 2013

An unusual excess of Ragwort in our meadow brought with it an unprecedented number of Cinnabar caterpillars. Ragwort is poisonous to some mammals, but it is the only food plant of these caterpillars.


Ref: 20130925_p10_20130805_1549_897 cinnabar moth caterpillar on ragwort (crop 2)(r+mb id@768).jpg


Image Taken on 14 Aug 2011 at 14:38    Image of day on 30 Sep 2011

This Cinabar this caterpillar was waving itself about. A knowledgable visitor tells us they tend to do this when they are hosting the larva of a parasitic fly.


Ref: 20110930_db1_20110814_1438_044 cinnabar moth caterpillar on ragwort leaf waving head end about (crop)(r+mb id@576).jpg


Image Taken on 17 Jul 2020 at 17:41    Image of day on 22 Aug 2020

Little and Large - Cinnabar Moth Caterpillar style.


Ref: 20200822_d73_20200717_1741_003 cinnabar moth caterpillars (large and tiny) on unopened ragwort flower(r+mb id@768).jpg


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